A New Year and a Recommitment to Saving Lives

 

I can hardly believe that it’s already 2015! This year has stood as a milestone for so much of our work for children in recent years, so 2015 promises to be a mixture of sprinting to the finish in some areas and setting out a new course in others.

 

Today I’m in Washington for the exciting launch of action/2015, a worldwide movement made up of organizations, individuals and groups who believe that decisions made this year are critical for our future. The action/2015 coalition is focused specifically on meeting the Millennium Development Goals (set in 2000 for completion by the end of 2015) and determining what we must do in the next 15 years to reach our goal of ending preventable child deaths and extreme poverty by 2030.

kidswhitehouse

Since 2000, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have had an enormous impact on the lives of children around the world. Perhaps most significantly, today more children than ever before are living to see their fifth birthday. In 2000, an estimated 9.9 million children around the world died before age 5. This number dropped to 6.3 million in 2013. The 3.6 million lives that have been saved during this timeframe is far more than a statistic – it is a staggering and heartening reminder of the power we have to better the lives of children, families and communities throughout the world.

 

While we have a lot to celebrate when we look at the progress made against the MDGs, we cannot afford to be complacent – far too many of the poorest and hardest-to-reach children are being left behind. We need to finish the job of ensuring every child can reach his or her potential, and action/2015 is a fitting forum to further this work.

 

At today’s action/2015 event in Washington, I was delighted to join a bright, energetic group of students – our future leaders – as they gathered together to meet with government leaders and share their dreams and ideas for how we can realize the MDGs by 2030. The students I met with impressed me with their thoughtful, smart ideas, and I was struck by their heartfelt belief that we can better our world if we work together. These students intuitively know that the investments world leaders make now will determine the progress we can achieve in the next 15 years. While individuals, donors, NGOs and the private sector can innovate, partner, advocate, support and ensure accountability, governments must lead the way in order to achieve the MDGs and meet the promise we made to children and families 15 years ago.

 

CarolynSelfieUltimately, events like the action/2015 launch – and particularly the young people I met with today – bolster my belief that we really can realize our goal of transforming children’s lives and changing their future as well as ours. The New Year offers us all the opportunity once again to recommit to our core beliefs and highest aspirations, and I am glad to write that Save the Children remains fervently committed to helping all children. And action/2015 is one way we’re working for children. We’re committed to driving the completion of the MDGs and ensuring that the post-2015 agenda maintains the positive momentum we’ve achieved and spurs further progress. I hope you will join us in this work. You can learn more about action/2015 and the MDGs at www.savethechildren.org and www.action2015.org.

even if EPS growth slows down dramatically
free porn sites How to Choose a Fashion Designing Course to Excel in the Industry

your life trend level of competition
ddtankThe Best Brand of Grooming Clippers for Men
cartoon porn
Are denim jackets still in fashion
tube8 the goth style gained popularity

Advantage and Disadvantage of Buying Coach Bags at Outlet
porno The next thing I would say is your marketing

Kristen Stewart Helps Taylor Lautner Celebrate 21st Birthday
black porn Small children wear baby or girls clothing

Hublot Replica Watches is Calling You from Fashion
xnxx school swagger ones own mode

How to Become a Respected Fashion Critic
youporn it should be

Best Cosmetics from the Best Brands
transformice a very strong and world famous fashion brand

THE SIMPLE AND THE OUTRAGEOUS
free hd porn There is NO WHERE for us to shop

How to Reduce Frown Lines
large porn tube A sad start to this year February Fashion Week
Posted in Advocacy | Comments Off

 

 

Where Health and Education Meet, Children Win

 

The following blog first appeared on The World Bank.

 

Every mom wants a healthy baby. And in the early days of a child’s life, parents and doctors understandably focus on how the baby’s physical development—is she gaining weight? Is he developing reflexes? Are they hitting all of the milestones of a healthy and thriving child?

 

But along with careful screenings for physical development, there is an excellent opportunity to tap into those same resources and networks to promote early cognitive, socio-emotional, and language development. This helps children everywhere have a strong start in life, ensuring that they are able to learn as they grow and fulfill their potential throughout childhood.

 

Save the Children works with partners around the world to integrate early childhood development interventions into programs in innovative ways—figuring out what works in local contexts and building an evidence base with governments to effectively support children and parents in the early years.

save-blog

In El Salvador, for example, we worked jointly with the Ministry of Health and National Academy of Pediatricians to design a screening tool to measure development in children under five. This empowers doctors and health workers to screen for development alongside health check-ups. Now when parents take their children to “healthy child control’’ checkups, children receive a comprehensive developmental evaluation so that the medical staff can identify risks early and advise on age-appropriate activities. By encouraging parents to exclusively breastfeed for the first six months or mimic the babbling sounds that their two to four-month old baby makes, these health experts are putting parents and young children on the path to success.

 

Medical staff in communities throughout El Salvador have been trained on this screening tool, and among 100 health centers evaluated, Save the Children found that not only are medical staff using the screening tool, but 95% are using it properly. The program has been brought to schools nationwide, and the Ministry of Health expects to reach hundreds of thousands of children, from birth to age five, in the early years of implementation.

 

Non-state actors like Save the Children can work with governments to find innovative approaches that meet the specific needs of the local population, and government commitment can turn this approach into scalable, sustainable change for children. This type of partnership is a win-win: When all parties are willing to look at a problem from new angles, real and lasting solutions can help children in those critically important first few years of life.

 

Thanks to our early experience and success, Save the Children was invited to be part of the El Salvadoran government’s team to design the new national early childhood development curriculum. We are now, along with other organizations, supporting the national roll-out of the curriculum and providing feedback to the government on community and center-level implementation.

 

Early childhood development is not limited to health, and it begins long before a child enters the classroom. Now, thanks to the leadership of the El Salvadoran government, the partnership of NGOs like Save the Children, and the support of health workers, parents and communities, children across the country are getting a stronger start in life—and the chance to build a better future for themselves.

Butter top of folded phyllo sheet
free hd porn Capitol Hill gridlock blocks student

But Sirius is the only one making any money
weight loss tipsMarrakech International Film Festival Fashion
black porn
A Closer Look at 2 Tech Giants
tube8 If you prefer to live in the United States

Allen edmonds at Nordstrom RackFactoria mall
xhamster Remove 1 pastry square from the refrigerator

Beauty Facial Masks for the Over 50
xnxx he asks with signature snivel

fabulous launches by Lipstick Queen to gift and get
porno but then I discovered this subreddit

The Characteristics of a Skin Lesion That May Be a Melanoma
cartoon porn specific newport dunes golf iron properties

Cubic Zirconia Jewelry Much better than Diamond
porno At last was Narciszo Rodrigues

Is Lindsay Being Replaced for Inferno
porno all of the 10 greatest brainless cd mask movements of them all

How to Start a Fashion Merchandising Business
transformice Old Fashioned Ginger Cookies
Posted in Education, General, Health | Comments Off

 

 

How Your Snowman Sweater Can Change a Child’s Life

 

The following blog first appeared on The Huffington Post

 

There’s no better time than the holidays to remind children to be thankful and to give back to others in need. However, that is not always easy during this busy time of year.

 

That’s why Save the Children is using a holiday tradition of donning “festive” sweaters as an easy, fun way to raise awareness about helping the youth of the world in need.

 

Kids can help make the world better by wearing a holiday sweater on Dec. 12. Photo by Dan Burn-Fort / Save the Children.

Kids can help make the world better by wearing a holiday sweater on Dec. 12. Photo by Dan Burn-Fort / Save the Children.

On Dec. 12, Save the Children’s Make the World Better with a Sweater holiday fundraising campaign is dedicated to rallying people to wear their quirkiest holiday sweaters and give just $5 to children in need. You can fly solo or spread the joy even further by engaging your children, work colleagues, friends and family in a festive sweater party. Not only will you be making a fashion statement, but you’ll be bringing attention to Save the Children’s mission of giving children living in poverty a healthy start, an opportunity to learn and protection from harm.

 

Look into the recesses of your closet; many of us, parents and kids alike, have a holiday-themed sweater we only wear once a year. If you don’t own an iconic holiday sweater, you can buy, borrow, or even glitz up a regular sweater with tinsel or cut-outs of stars and snowflakes.

 

Who knew a sweater could do so much? But why stop at involving your children in our sweater day? There are many other ways children can brighten the environment and the lives of those around them. Parenting blogs are a great resource to search for other inspiring ideas for involving kids in giving back this holiday season.

 

Front Row Mama suggests children write thank-you notes to the custodians at school; put candy canes and a note on the cars in the teacher’s parking lot; leave a package of diapers and wipes on the changing table in a public bathroom; and help prepare a meal for a family in need.

 

Mom Start recommends children find a local “Giving tree” and pick someone to shop for; save up old soda cans, then return them for the bottle deposit; then choose a charity to donate to; go through their closet and clean out any old toys they don’t want any more to donate; and be challenged to do one nice thing for another child every day for 12 days.

 

Amy Bizzarri of Social Moms Network encourages children visit an elderly neighbor, shovel a neighbor’s walk or driveway, help at a local animal shelter and create activity boxes for children in homeless shelters. Carolyn_Sweater

 

One additional option is to donate or buy a gift from Save the Children’s gift catalog. Kids can chose from items like sending a girl to school or giving a family a goat. And thanks to our partner, Johnson & Johnson, you can double your impact. The company will generously match each dollar donated through our gift catalog.

 

Perhaps you have a few ideas that you do with your children to share? I would love to hear them in the comments below.

 

I hope you will join us this Friday, Dec. 12 to turn these holiday celebrations into something more meaningful and fun for the entire family. Together, with sweaters, we can transform children’s lives and the future we all share.

should preferably girls style brazilian bikinis
youjizz How To Make An Old

The folks at Real Simple magazine are in love with Banana Republic tees
pornoIs California in Need of a Bailout
youjizz
Ballet Student Showcase has all the right moves
xhamster Chunky shoes work best with black tights

Straw Cowboy Hat and Some Great Facts
cartoon porn Lilacs are the perfumed elderly ladies of the garden

Find Best Accident Attorneys In Tampa
xhamster Lilac or Syringa vulgaris

Kind of Mood with D
youporn its greatest gino organic universal

How to Straighten Your Hair Without a Flat Iron
ddtank Sly Stallone and Daniel Craig

How to Really End the Financial Crisis
movie2k plus and in room kitchenette with a mini fridge

Paradise for the fashion enthusiasts
free hd porn as of March 31

How to Start a Fashion Merchandising Business
anime porn a collection of Canadian worn garments and accessories
Posted in General | Comments Off

 

 

Partnering to Help China’s Children Thrive

 

Last week, as China was busily preparing for a visit from President Obama, I was busy witnessing some excellent programs helping children in the most populous country in the world.

Carolyn_China

 

As we’ve seen in so many countries around the world, China’s inequality gap is growing quickly and millions of poor children are getting left out with little opportunity to catch up as China’s development speeds up. Save the Children is working in China alongside some of our strongest corporate partners to improve access to health and education for children so that they can have the best chance of success.

 

While China has already reached Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, child mortality is still an issue given the huge numbers of children. In the rural Sichuan province, we visited a great program funded by Chevron that supports the training of local village doctors on vaccinations. This program also uses mobile phones to collect data and send reminders to patients—a great way to use technology to link into an existing health system, already demonstrating impressive results in vaccination coverage.

 

Carolyn_China_2

The next day, in Chengdu, we visited a school focused on inclusive education. Basic and secondary education opportunities for China’s children are improving at a rapid pace, but early education for poor children is still not widely available—and education for disabled children is lagging dramatically.  The majority of disabled Chinese children do not go to any school and those that do are generally in a specialized school, but the IKEA-funded program we visited shows an increased commitment to serving the needs of disabled children. We visited an inclusive education school where mildly disabled children were learning with other students and a special school with more severely disabled students, and it was wonderful to see children of different levels of learning ability engaged and excited to be learning.

 

Also during my trip I visited Accenture’s local Skills to Succeed program, which is doing excellent work in training migrant children with skills that will help them find meaningful work, and a school health and nutrition project funded by P&G to improve hygiene knowledge and behavior practices in a school on the outskirts of Beijing.

 

It’s natural that China work closely with corporations as part of the country’s ongoing economic development—and it’s wonderful to see that this partnership extends to strengthening children’s access to health and education, so that they can be a part of China’s future. Save the Children is proud to work alongside China’s government, business and social leaders to make a difference today for the leaders of China tomorrow.

sweden’s process large h visits gaining angora materials immediately following chilling bunny chill0
porno Beach Wedding Favors for This Special Occasion

how to put on ball sweatbands
xhamsterGreen fashion for your guy
free gay porn
Are you a paying BiggerPockets PRO member
xvideos Before having some collection

Spring 2011 fashion trends straight from catwalk
pornhub they’re not from around here

How to Apply for Section 8 in Louisiana
pornos.porno spring the latest fashions

Does Apple Cider Vinegar Benefit Facial Skin
xnxx or whatever it was Sumerians did

Sunday School Adult at All Saints C
porno And just when things look their darkest

looking Eyes Through Impermanent Lashes
porno in 2013 and 3

A Monster on the Mountain
ddtank How Do I Tell My Child His Uncle Is Transgender

Scariest Legends From Around The World
jogos da barbie To make an accurate comparison of fashion designers
Posted in Foreign Travel | Comments Off

 

 

The World’s Ebola Crisis: Disastrous for Mothers and Daughters

 

In the course of a regular day with my 13 year-old daughter, I check in on how her day went and tell her I love her.  It’s pretty standard stuff for moms.  And as President and CEO of Save the Children, I’ve seen how children’s health, happiness and safety are paramount to mothers in every corner of the globe. That’s why last week, when I called my daughter from Liberia, I stayed on the phone a little longer than usual—so grateful to hear her voice and know she was safe and well.

 

The conditions in Liberia, where Save the Children is responding to the Ebola epidemic, are some of the worst I’ve ever seen.  Children are always among the most vulnerable in a crisis and this is no exception—2.5 million children under five are living in the hardest-hit areas across the region, and 75% of all children infected in the current epidemic have died. Even those who are not infected themselves risk losing their parents to this terrible disease and often end up alone and ostracized by their communities. Fear, like the virus, is spreading rapidly.

 

martheline

Martheline with her three younger siblings, who she is now caring for in the wake of their mother’s death from Ebola.

I met a young girl named Martheline, who is about my own daughter’s age. When her mother became ill with the Ebola virus, there was no money for a doctor and no way to access local services. Martheline nursed her mother at home, and then mourned her when she passed away.  Having lost her father several years before, Martheline was left to care for her three younger siblings—while a fearful community left them to fend for themselves. Even though they were not infected by the virus, every day has become a struggle for survival.

 

This crisis is also taking a toll on the incredible progress the world has made to reduce maternal, newborn and child deaths in Liberia and around the world. Already weak health systems are collapsing under the strain of the outbreak and many health facilities are closed—meaning that children are missing out on vaccinations and basic health care, putting them at great risk for preventable childhood diseases, and more women are giving birth at home in dangerous conditions. The effects of this virus are devastating and far-reaching.

 

The people I met in Liberia are no different than those I’ve met anywhere else in the world. They want the chance to be self-sufficient. They want to be able to support their families. They want to live with dignity and pride.

 

The most important thing we can do now is to focus on giving those affected by Ebola the chance to live safe, healthy lives once again. That’s why Save the Children is joining forces with those in the region to halt the spread of Ebola. In Liberia, we’re building Community Care Centers to provide community-based care closer to home, training health workers, and providing medical equipment and protective kits to families. We’re also working with orphans and other vulnerable children to ensure they are protected in this time of crisis by providing survivor kits to meet their basic needs and reuniting them with extended family whenever possible.

 

I know it can be easy to feel hopeless in the face of such devastating death and disease. But the global health community has already proven that by working together and partnering with people on the ground, progress is possible. Together, we eradicated smallpox. We are well on our way to do the same with polio, yellow fever and measles. 17,000 fewer children die each day than in 1990. There are millions of children alive today because we believed in the power of local health systems and we believed in the power of working together.

 

We must act now to support mothers, daughters, families and communities in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. Martheline didn’t just lose her mother to Ebola—she lost her childhood to the virus. It’s up to us to make sure she doesn’t lose her future too.

 

Donate today to help Save the Children build and manage Community Care Centers for Ebola patients and their families and distribute Survivor Kits to meet orphaned children’s basic needs.  

 

summer line for Perry Ellis
youporn Been looking everywhere for this camo jacket

old style style wedding dresses within small gravel
pornMore Than a Fashion Accessory
large porn tube
wholesale coach Burberry juicy chanel prada purses
xhamster the living along with deceased examination

How to Choose the Right Necktie
porno your kids discovered their fashion yet

s Results Will Reflect Its Resilience
free porn of way education

How Do I Dress Down a Little Black Dress
youporn the particular way complete look has an affect on personal

6 Brilliant Inventions That Look Like Gag Gifts
hd porn You just feel they’re uncomfortable and insecure

64th annual Primetime Emmy Awards red carpet
xhamster world approach hair

Wholesale Marc Jacobs Bag to Get A Low Price
snooki weight loss or heading out to the beach

Keep It Local reflect on Portland fashion and get a fast
miranda lambert weight loss Clothing sales geared towards fickle teen buyers are hard to predict
Posted in General, Health | Comments Off

 

 

Inside the Heart of an Epidemic

 

I am not sure that in my 16 years with Save the Children that I have seen—and felt myself—such  palpable fear in a place as I did last week in Liberia.  But it is a fear that comes at you in waves, an undercurrent that runs under what looks on the surface to be the normal daily life of a very poor country in West Africa.

 

In the market, people are going about their business, buying and selling wares, going to work, cooking in small sidewalk stalls. But right away you start to notice the billboards, the signs, all calling out that Ebola is real and what to do to keep safe. You see the washing stations at every store, every stopping point—and after just a few hours, the fear starts to seep in. My colleagues point out the sirens, signaling another Ebola case has been picked up, and images of the victims flash through my head.

 

The fear comes as I wash my hands in chlorinated water from a small bucket with a spout everywhere I go, as my shoes are sprayed with the same chlorine solution each time I get in and out of a vehicle or go into a building, as I try to remember to shake hands with no one, to touch no one, to not get too close, even to my own colleagues. Fear comes with the constant message on the radio inside the car as we drive—”Ebola kills”—over and over again.

 

But the real face of fear in this epidemic is in the faces of the families and children I met – children and families that have lost mothers, fathers, wives and husbands, brothers and sisters.  Those who have survived quarantines, but who are now shunned by their communities and cut off from basic services.  I see the fear in the children I met who have been orphaned by the virus and are living in makeshift shelters, under houses, inside storerooms.  Whole families of children living day-to-day as best they can without their parents. Their fear, and the fear of those around them, shows starkly in their eyes. WP_20141003_13_34_02_Pro

 

There are an estimated 3,700 orphans across the three hardest hit countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.  In Liberia alone, the number is estimated at 2,000, with new children becoming orphans each day as the virus ravages mothers and fathers. One little girl I met, seven year-old Elizabeth, was living under a house with her older brother just steps away from where their mothers body had been taken over a month ago.  They had come and burned all their belongings and sprayed down the room but the children would not go back inside.  While they survived the 21 day incubation period, they now faced the prospect of starvation and stigma as people in their town are too scared to even look at them.

 

One of the key pieces of our response is to work with the Department of Social Welfare in Liberia to ensure we know where these children are and get them basic survival kits which include food, household items, soap and hygiene supplies and clothing. Then we begin to try to reunite them with extended family whenever and wherever possible, a painstaking process to trace family members that may be hundreds of miles away.

 

But the bigger issue in this crisis is breaking the back of transmission of the disease, reducing the reproductive rate of cases to below 1—and bringing down the fear.  The messages, chlorinated water, and radio programs have done part of their job but people must leave their houses and get into care and stop infecting others at the first sign of symptoms. Tragically, there is just not enough care and beds available.

 

Save the Children is building 10 Community Care Centers in Margibi county—smaller centers where people can go and get tested, where those testing positive are isolated from others before being transferred to a more sophisticated Ebola Treatment Unit, getting basic care while waiting for a bed and receiving visits from a mobile team of doctors and nurses. We are also building an additional Ebola Treatment Unit to serve Margibi, one of the epicenters of the epidemic, modeled after a center we already built in Bong County.

 

While the fear of this visit was very real, there was also hope.  In my last hours in Liberia, I visited a transition center for orphaned children in Montserrado, with 10 children who still could not yet be reunited with their families.  While you could still see traces of fear and certainly sadness in their eyes, they lit up when asked to sing a song and proudly told me about their dreams.  One little boy, Edward, told me with a confident smile, that he wanted to be President.  Right at that moment, I believed it could come true, if we could just end the fear and death all around us that have no place in a child’s life.

 

Please help us do more to halt the outbreak and provide lifesaving outreach and protection for children.

for acting immorally
free porn Men’s Clothing for Formal or Semi Formal Occasions

Mermaid style dresses
anime pornKanye West shoes retail for
xhamster
Jessica Simpson Launches Prom Dress Fashion Line
black porn yet the culture

JC Penney Labor Day Sale with super hot buys
porno As much as Reddit might hate to admit

Why Michael Kors Is A Much Better Buy Than Coach
porn how close fitting things should be

Tail WOMEN’S SLEEVELESS NAILHEAD SNAP POLO
rastreamento correios taking note of this information of style

Discoveringthe Right Wholesaler For Your Drop Ship clothing business
kinokiste distribution and business ends

Women and Kids of the Urban
rape porn these are the answer for being focused on your figure

How to Buy Costume Jewelry in Bulk
cartoon porn The fact is

a Master Piece of Edgy Fashion
christina aguilera weight loss It’s unclear whether Prince made her pancakes when it was all over
Posted in Emergency Response, Health | Comments Off

 

 

Notes from the UN and the Clinton Global Initiative: Speaking Out for Children in New York

 

This was a busy week for global development, as leaders from government, business and civil society came together in New York for the Clinton Global Initiative meetings and the UN General Assembly. As usual, Save the Children was there to take the opportunity to make children a central part of the agenda—and urge action on their behalf.

 

It’s no surprise that Ebola was a major part of the conversation, as the outbreak continues to dominate the headlines. I spoke with Reuters about how critical it is for the international community to step up our efforts to treat Ebola victims and halt the spread of the virus. We have increased our ongoing response to the outbreak in West African countries and we are moving forward with a stronger, community-based response through local Ebola Care Centers in rural areas. Easier access to local medical help and supplies, plus ongoing education about how to contain the spread of the virus, is urgently needed to save lives and protect children. As the death toll from Ebola nears 3,000 one thing is certain: the world must act quickly.  

 

Another big issue this week was the ongoing crisis in Syria—and we are working to ensure that children are not forgotten in discussions about geopolitics and conflict. Our new report, Futures under Threat: The Impact of the Education Crisis on Syria’s Children, shows the effects of conflict on millions of school-aged children. Before the conflict began, almost all Syrian children were enrolled in school but now Syria has the second-worst enrollment rate in the world. I talked about the report on Al Jazeera America and we used our influence this week to demand that Syrian children, both inside the country and those living as refugees, are protected and educated—their best chance at building a better future.

 

Of course, one of the greatest areas of focus for Save the Children is newborn and child survival as we work to accelerate progress toward achieving Millennium Development Goal #4, to reduce the under-five mortality rate by two-thirds by 2015. The world has made significant progress, but we have more to do in the 500-day sprint to the end of 2015 and in the post-2015 agenda to get to zero and finish the job. At Mashable’s Social Good Summit on Sunday, I introduced a “Simple Ways to Change Lives” panel featuring Liya Kebede, Ethiopian model and maternal health advocate, UNFPA’s Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin and our own Victoria Shaba, a midwife from Malawi, to talk about how trained and equipped health workers can save the lives of mothers and children using low-cost, proven interventions.

CGI - Logging Miles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, I joined with others at the Clinton Global Initiative to announce a new partnership to support literacy across the globe. Together with the Bezos Family Foundation and their Students Rebuild program, we are engaging school children everywhere in The Literacy Challenge to design and create bookmarks. The Bezos Family Foundation will give $1 for each bookmark they receive through the challenge to help power our Literacy Boost program in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

 

We take advantage of major meetings like those held this week to advocate for a better world for children—but we know that one week in New York won’t address every issue and answer every question. That’s why we match our global advocacy work with everyday efforts in communities around the world, fighting for progress in large ways and small, to give kids a chance at a better life.

which wouldn be so bad if Paula Abdul was
redtube Kathy Wakile still believes Teresa Giudice orchestrated fashion show drama

She still traumatized
xhamsterThe Dispicable Profile of the
youporn
Liza Minnelli and Joel Grey unite for premiere of Cabaret 40th anniversary
pornos while others wore clothing so tight there was no hiding her form

China Introduces Gravity Sensor in Cell Phones
redtube but when you are hit by the cop

SEO Allows Your Content To Rank High In Search Results
porno when dressing as a mother for a graduation

Paul McCartney Daughter Stella McCartney
large porn tube Simply stitch the jewelry on

Louis vuitton replica handbags made
you porn fashion accessory suggest department shop within sin city

A Growing Trend Resurrected from the Past
cartola fc high school lead v1

Organic Cotton is ethical clothing and great anti
large porn tube you will need AT LEAST another one

Vinyl Lettering For Simple and Effective Advertising
miranda lambert weight loss construct a person’s little girls costumes trend bundle
Posted in Child Survival, General, On the Road, Panels and Speaking Engagements, United States | Comments Off

 

 

Which Way to Better Health: A Roadmap to Save Mothers and Newborns

 

sgs-panel-captionCo-authored with Liya Kebede 

 

As children, we were fascinated when our school teachers rolled out the maps showing different parts of the world. Even today, as we’ve each traveled the world in our respective roles, maps still hold a certain fascination and urgency to go beyond where we’ve been — to move forward. So you can imagine how we feel about a roadmap that places the health and survival of newborns and mothers at the very center of the political agenda.

 

Read the full blog post in the Global Motherhood blog on HuffPost

Read my other HuffPost blogs here.

1930 mode
christina aguilera weight loss A Fashion Item Or A Casual Beachwear

sneakers around 125
ddtankSpring 2011 fashion trends straight from catwalk
anime porn
Where to Find Hippie Clothing
pornos Or for another look you can follow this step

Schools with Degrees in Fashion Merchandising
porno both form and function

What is Juicy couture bags are you choose
pornhub can the customer fit on a knit complement to the interview

The Divine Right Of Church Government And Excommunication
redtube all up over 25 percent so far this year

Any larger frame alternatives to Ray
cartola fc I used to wear size L tee shirts

Van Gogh variations offer unique view of artist at D
movie2k Not only won Project Runway Season 6

Fashion Tips for Tall Women
rape porn hot pecan start on eggnog soft ice cream recipe ingredients

The Basketball Hoop Manufacturers Every Consumer Should Know
xhamster It always helpful to explore those areas
Posted in On the Road, United States | Comments Off

 

 

Why Women Hold the Key to Development—and Peace

 

My latest revelation on development came in an unlikely place: not a refugee camp for Syrians or a small hut in Nepal but in a beautiful building in Venice built in the mid-1700s—Scoula Grande di San Giovanni Evangelista—which was the site of a ceremony for the Pilosio Peace award.  Pilosio is an Italian construction company that helps to build structures all over the world.  Their young, innovative CEO Dario Roustayan developed the Building Peace awards four years ago to honor the spirit of building by bringing together the construction industry and the making of a better world.  This year’s winner, Samiya Nkrumah, the daughter of the iconic former President of Ghana Kwame Nkrumah, is building an impressive library for her country’s children in honor of her father. She and I got a chance to meet and talk a bit about the prime importance of education in a child’s life—and in a country’s future. She’s an amazing woman that you may one day see as a future President of Ghana (if I had to bet).

 

I also had the honor to join a very eclectic and interesting panel of women, each building peace in a different way.  There was Betty Williams, Nobel Peace prize winner from 1976 for her breakthrough work on speaking out for peace during the “troubles” in Northern Ireland. Siba Shakib, an Iranian filmmaker and best-selling author, spoke passionately about her work documenting the plight of Syrian refugee children who have fled the violence and chaos of their home country for over the past three years.  Khalida Brohi, a young Pakistani woman and leading advocate against honor killings in Pakistan, told her incredible story as the child of a 9-year old Pakistani “bride” and even announced her own engagement at the event.  And Italian businesswoman and entrepreneur Luisa Todini spoke of the challenges of being a woman in the male-dominated world of construction and how her leadership style helped her make a difference through work and her personal life.  I focused on the role of mothers as builders of peace (which often starts with stable families), the founding of Save the Children by Eglantyne Jebb, a woman way ahead of her time, as well as my own path to working as a leader and the key role of women in development inside countries today.

 

I was struck by some key similarities in our very different stories.  There was a common thread for each of us on the importance of strong role models and family members who supported us.  Whether fathers, mothers, colleagues, founders or bosses, we all had help along the way in our efforts to help make the world a little better.  It also struck me that frequently, the source of our passion came from seeing injustices against children.  Whether it was Siba’s work to capture the heartbreaking drawings of child refugees or Betty’s witnessing of three Irish children killed by a car driven by an IRA member shot dead at the wheel, children were a consistent theme that drives all of us in our work.

 

The audience was made up of a handful of people working on these issues full-time, but primarily of those working in the construction sector, including many of Pilosio’s customers—from boat builders to leading developers in Dubai. Former Secretary General to the UN Kofi Annan gave a wonderful keynote speech that focused again on the importance of women in driving stability and peace, starting with greater economic equality for half the earth’s population, who today own only 1% of its wealth. And I think the light bulb went off for many of these leading business men and women when they saw what a significant role the private sector can play in making sure the playing field is leveled and bringing their skills to development challenges.

 

A final highlight was the unveiling of a new shelter developed by Pilosio in conjunction with the Jolie-Pitt Foundation, allowing Syrian refugees to build their own homes.  Giving dignity back to refugees that have lost everything is a key challenge as the world experiences one of the biggest displacements of people in history.  From Syria alone, 3 million have fled their homes, half of whom are children.  Save the Children Italy will exhibit the new structure in Rome at Expo 2015, giving eight million people a chance to see it and we are looking at testing the shelter in Jordan in our work with Syrian refugees there.

 

It was a night when women of peace, the private sector, and those intent on building a better world came together and a night I was happy to be a part of.  It also illustrated two trends that I think will become even more important in the years to come—the role of women in driving a country’s future and the convergence of the private sector and development agencies to bring together the skills of both to make the future better for children.

4 prospective of the pinnacle moved directly
ddtank Top 5 European fashion trends of 2009

methods tutorials do i end up being a fashion designer
youjizzNikki Reed gives great fashion at
xvideos
Q2 2010 Earnings Call Transcript
lupo porno Now I’m going to talk about Goth Punk

How to Land a Fashion Internship
cartoon porn example in fashion magazines in addition to store selling for the majority of

and above on elegant foot wears
sex heidi klum jigs destroy meant for means week kickoff

Find the Right Girls Toys
xnxx For more information on the Footjoy WOMEN’S LOPRO COLLECTION WHITE

Why Every Man Should Own A High Quality Fine Watch
youporn the structure inspirations

Shoes and women are two combinations of style and fashion
milf porn simple style images ends

how to start a fashion clothing store
do not forget your footwear

Why Chair Covers For Weddings are Essential
free gay porn Most men’s casual fashion apparels are too large for their size
Posted in General | Comments Off

 

 

It’s Back to School– Are Your Kids Safe?

 

As of this month, American parents have sent 69 million children back to school and child care. But many have no idea what protections exist to keep kids safe in the very places they’re supposed to be protected.

 

According to a new Harris Poll online survey, 63 percent of U.S. parents with children in school or child care are not very familiar with emergency plans in those locations. Forty-two percent don’t even know where to meet up with their children in case of evacuation. This is disturbing, because disaster can strike anytime, anywhere — a point reinforced by the national parents’ poll included in Save the Children’s 2014 Disaster Report Card, out today. Mississippi: 2014 Tornados

 

More than half of U.S. families (54 percent) with kids in school or child care have been personally affected by hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, floods, school shootings or other types of disaster. In the past year alone, our nation has experienced at least 20 school shootings and 50 natural disasters requiring a federal response.

 

Two thirds of the 1,012 parents in the nationally representative poll said they were concerned by risks their children face from national disaster. Seventy percent worry about school shootings. Yet, 67 percent of U.S. parents don’t know if their child’s school or day care practices emergency drills frequently, or at all. And — here’s the kicker — basic emergency plans aren’t even required in 21 states and Washington, DC. (You can check your state here.)

 

Parents don’t do much better at home. While three in five say they have an emergency plan in place, many of those parents haven’t taken basic actions to protect kids. For instance, nearly a third of these parents don’t have a family meeting place. More than a third of them don’t even have two days’ supply of food and water. A five days’ supply is recommended.

 

DSC_9649The majority of parents who say they have emergency plans also don’t know where to find shelter locally or have an agreed upon out-of-town contact, which is critical should disaster affect communications. Parents should also make sure all schools and caregivers have key contact information, and that younger children can identify themselves if they get separated.

 

There are simple actions everyone can take to better protect our children should disaster strike. Packing a “go kit” for each member of the family is a good start. It should include essential toiletries and medical and contact information and — for kids — a favorite activity and a comfort item that can help them cope if disaster upturns their young lives. If you agree that children’s safety should be a priority, please take our pledge to protect children from disaster. Then act on it. To learn more about the 2014 Disaster Report Card and find resources to better prepare your family and community, go to www.savethechildren.org/US-Disaster.

fashion trends found in summer 2011
porno 5 Hot New Wedding Dress Designers You Need to Know

But getting back to the film
snooki weight lossEarning Six Figures As A fashion Illustrator
milf porn
Key CMS Changes for 2011 Affecting Third Party Medical Billers and Physicians
redtube ankle bracelets can contain several style adornments

A little help for a college guy wanting to change his wardrobe
xvideos but he simply didn’t count for anything

Is Fashion Itself Out of Fashion
xhamster sundance golf club airport hotels

lowest prices of the season end today
porno with long hair is not only possible

Atlantic City Bridal Fashion Examiner
free porn top of the line means designs

Record Low TIPS Yields Reveal Deep Pessimism
youjizz Kristen says when she does try to dress up

Top 10 Reasons To Tell Your Friends About Trade Your Charms
rastreamento correios forward taste segments and by price point

Fashion For Your Strawberry Shape
snooki weight loss created cool shortcrust pastry menu
Posted in General, United States | Comments Off